reminder to get access to Charles Tryon’s “Writing and Citizenship: Using Blogs to Teach First-Year Composition”

Note to self: get a copy of this.  Looks interesting, especially the emphasis on what’s unique to blogs: “blogging’s ephemerality, its focus on the everyday, and its no-holds-barred…”

Tryon, Charles
Writing and Citizenship: Using Blogs to Teach First-Year Composition
Pedagogy – Volume 6, Issue 1, Winter 2006, pp. 128-132

Duke University Press

Pedagogy 6.1 (2006) 128-132 _________________________________________________________________ [Access article in PDF] Writing and Citizenship: Using Blogs to Teach First-Year Composition Charles Tryon [Works Cited for From the Classroom] One of my major goals as a first-year composition instructor is to find ways for students to take charge of their writing, to provide them with a sense that writing matters. Within this context, I have sought to think about the classroom in the terms described by Richard Ohmann (2003: 124): “The supposition that higher education and schooling in general serve a democratic society by nourishing hearty citizenship.” Ideally, this model of higher education should work against consumerist models that encourage students to view themselves as passive consumers rather than active participants. More important, a composition class that nourishes citizenship should convey the connections between the classroom and the so-called real world, which seems to exist everywhere else. In order to foster this notion of citizenship, I have incorporated into my first-year composition courses the requirement that students write, and sometimes read, Web logs. Web logs, as Rebecca Blood (2002) explains in The Weblog Handbook, are Web sites that consist of dated entries usually in reverse chronological order and often linked to news articles or other blog entries. They have had a mixed reception among academics and journalists alike for a variety of reasons. Most notably, blogging communities have a reputation for wild, unfettered political commentary, hardly the form of writing that would seem to lend itself to reflection or the multiple revisions of a polished essay. However, my specific investment in Web logs celebrates precisely these qualities that are often criticized: blogging’s ephemerality, its focus on the everyday, and its no-holds-barred…

Advertisements

One thought on “reminder to get access to Charles Tryon’s “Writing and Citizenship: Using Blogs to Teach First-Year Composition”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s