Religion in the Writing Classroom bibliography

7-9-09 added Ranieri & Dubinsky (discussed in Speck 1996); added Fish
7-5-09 added Ritchie (discussed in Penti 28ff)
6-30-09 deleted Cain 2005 (had to do with institutional situation); deleted Perl On Austrian Soil, 2005 (not related enough)
6-29-09 added Darsey and Ritter; added Zulick
6-5-09 added Penti (cited in Sullivan); added Meadows
5-30-09 added Sullivan (discussed in Stolley)
5-17-09 added Schwehn (for background chapter), Wolfe (also for background chapter)
4-4-09 added Wuthnow 2000
3-13-09 added Moore
3-5-09 unpacked Buley-Meissner and Ess
3-4-09 Timmerman and Hettinga
3-3-09 added Powers 2001, Holmes
3-2-09 added Perl
2-28-09 added Edler, Milojević, Roemer, de Ruyter, Powers 2008
2-19-09 added Johnson
2-8-09 deleted Ganter (not close enough)
1-28-09 deleted Hashimoto (about voice only)
1-26-09 added Anson
1-23-09 added Worth, Hashimoto, Dively 1996, Fell; unpacked Negotiating Religious Faith…; removed Thelin (read it last spring, didn’t think it relevant enough)
1-16-09 added Trelstad, Metts, another Marsden, Speck, Hairston
1-14-09 added Stuchel
1-11-09 added Carter (3)
1-10-09 added Tite, Johnson 2001, Solvang, Calhoun et al, Shafer, Berthoff et al re “Interchanges: Spiritual Sites of Composing”
12-18-08 Added Cohen, Ritz, Trapp, Puccio.
12-16-08 further annotated McCrary, Swearingen, Rand, Dively; added Amorose, Brummett, Brandt, Kok, Perkins, Marsden 1997, Anlitz, Connors
12-7-08 Rhetoric & Public Affairs 7.4 (Winter 2004), Special Issue: Religious and Theological Traditions as Sources of Rhetorical Invention. (Thanks, TJ!)
12-7-08 added Campbell
12-5-08 added Bizzell
11-5-08 annotated Dively, France, et al
11-9-08 added Ganter, Lewis, Satterfield

Anderson, Chris. Teaching as Believing: Faith in the University. Baylor UP, 2004. Have copy of book.

Anderson, Chris. “The Description of an Embarrassment: When Students Write about Religion.”ADE Bulletin 094 (Winter 1989): 12-15. (I have a digital copy.) 01-14-08: here’s a link to this article: http://web2.ade.org/ade/bulletin/n094/094012.htm

“Anderson begins by asserting from his experience as a writing teacher that students typically write about issues of faith and religion in unsophisticated ways, often disclosing their ignorance about other issues.  Though some have interpreted his essay as hostile to students of faith, Anderson offers insight into the very real conflicts that writing teachers face when attempting to help students articulate personal commitments in academic settings, and he explains that the mystical character of religious discourse often accounts for the difficulties that students have in explaining their faith commitments to others.”

Anlitz, Susan E. “The Spiritual and Scholarly Life: A Journey.” http://seantlitz.com/identity/ Have Word copy. 12-16-08. Hard copy in file. Opening paragraph: “While I was originally drawn to Composition Studies partly because of the way student-centered (by which I mean interactive and flexible), constructivist, and process pedagogies fit with my Christian sensibilities, the journey of trying to integrate my spirituality with my studies has been both frustrating and rewarding. As such, I want to share that journey with other Christian students who may be endeavoring to find connections between their faith and their studies.”

Anson, Chris. “Response Styles and Ways of Knowing.” Writing and Response. Urbana: NCTE, 1989. 332-366. cited in Dively 1997 and elsewhere. Summited 1-26-09. Hard copy in file.

Bartholomae, David, “Composition” in Introduction to Scholarship in Modern Languages and Literatures. Ed. David G. Nicholls. New York: MLA, 2007.  103-125. Have copy of book. See my notes on conclusion chapter.

Bartholomae: At the end of his chapter introducing the reader to composition studies, says, “The important questions are persistent, and for me the most important have to do with student writing – its value and promise. Questions of value should be a constant source of debate and controversy. What is a good student paper? What makes it good? What is it good for? What genres of writing are appropriate for the college classroom? Are there emerging or possible genres that we have not yet given appropriate attention?…” 120

Berling, Judith A. “Is Conversation about Religion Possible? (And What Can Religionists Do to Promote it?).” Journal of the American Academy of Religion 61 (1993): 1-22. BV1460 .J6 Hard copy in file.

“I am proposing that our profession as “religionists” (scholars of religion and theology) carries with it a cultural role, perhaps even a value commitment, not to a particular form of religion or religiosity, but rather to a cultural engagement with the importance of religion and religious issues in public life by modelling an approach to conversation about religion suitable to our complex society and world” (2-3).

Berthoff, Ann. “Introductory Remarks” for “Interchanges: Spiritual Sites of Composing.” CCC 45. 2 (May 1994). See also Beth Daniell, JoAnn Campbell, C. Jan Swearingen, and James Moffett. Have actual copy of CCC issue, in file.

Boal, J.H., Randall J. Heeres, Frances R. Poston, and Keith A. Blanding. “Religion in the Classroom II.” The English Journal 73.2 (Feb 1984): 45-47. Hard copy in file. Filed under “Facets”

Brandt, Deborah, et al. “The Politics of the Personal: Storying Our Lives against the Grain.”  College English 64.1 (2001): 41-62. Hard copy in file.  Anne Ruggles Gere’s “Articles of Faith” is pages 46-47.

In this symposium, the authors do not seek to establish thetical-critical stances themselves; instead, they investigate the problems that arise when scholars adapt such approaches by merging their personal lives and beliefs with their professional identities. Anne Ruggles Gere writes specifically about her experiences “coming out” as a Christian in the academic world. Other contributors to the symposium are Deborah Brandt, Ellen Cushman, Anne Herrington, Richard E. Miller, Victor Villanueva, Min-Zhan Lu, and Gesa Kirsch.

Browning, Mark. “Symposium on Teaching in the Whirlwind: When Religion Becomes Visible in the Classroom.” Dialogue: A Journal for Writing    Specialists. 6 (1999): 6-7. Submitted ILL request 12-16-08 Received electronically 12-18-08 (but without “Your Logos Against Mine” below). Hard copy in file.

Browning, Mark. “Your Logos Against Mine.” Dialogue: A Journal for Writing Specialists. 6 (1999): 8-13. Hard copy in file. Religiously-informed writing is marginalized — in the composition readers, in classroom practice. Some good points I’ve not seen anywhere else. “Browning presents cogent reasons why instructors should be careful not to silence religious students and discusses how we can instead find ways to engage this aspect of identity” (from introduction to “Symposium on Teaching in the Whirlwind” p 6).

Brummett, Barry. “Rhetorical Epistemology and Rhetorical Spirituality.”  The Academy and the Possibility of Belief: Essays on Intellectual and Spiritual Life.  Eds. Mary-Louise Buley-Meissner, Mary McCaslin Thompson, and Elizabeth Bachrach Tan. Cresskill, NJ: Hampton Press, 2000. 121-135. Hard copy in file.

Buley-Meissner, Mary Louise, Mary McCaslin Thompson, and Elizabeth Bachrach Tan, eds. The Academy and the Possibility of Belief: Essays on the Intellectual and Spiritual Life. Cresskill, NJ: Hampton Press, 2000. Review of book: “This text challenges ideas that discussion of spirituality should be silenced; religious beliefs should be discarded rather than examined; or “higher” education means moving beyond faith to reason. It aims to open opportunities (pedagogical and theoretical) for inquiry into students’ worldviews.” Ordered via Summit 1-10-09.Summit-ed Jan 09. Listed/copied individual chapters 3-5-09.

Buley-Meissner, Mary Louise, Mary McCaslin Thompson, and Elizabeth Bachrach Tan. Introduction. The Academy and the Possibility of Belief: Essays on the Intellectual and Spiritual Life. Cresskill, NJ: Hampton Press, 2000. 1-11. Hard copy in file.

Campbell, JoAnn. “Writing To Heal: Using Meditation in the Writing Process” in “Interchanges: Spiritual Sites of Composing.” College Composition and Communication 45.2 (May 1994): 246-251. Have copy of issue, filed under Berthoff.

Carlton, Karen, and Chalon Emmons. “Every Moment Meditation: Teaching English as Spiritual Work.” The Academy and the Possibility of Belief: Essays on the Intellectual and Spiritual Life. Eds. Mary Louise Buley-Meissner, Mary McCaslin Thompson, and Elizabeth Bachrach Tan. Cresskill, NJ: Hampton Press, 2000. 17-38. Hard copy in file.

Carter, Shannon. “Living Inside the Bible (Belt).” College English 69.6 (July 2007): 572-595. Pdf, and hard copy in file.

Carter, Shannon. “Living Inside the Bible (Belt): What Vernacular Literacies Have to Teach Us About Academic Ones.” 57th Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC). Chicago, IL. March 2006. ILL’d 1-28-09. ILL cancelled, not available, and probably similar enough to article published in CE. (See email from Loretta Reily 1-29-09.)

Carter, Shannon. “Dr. Liberal in the Bible Belt: An Exploration of Conservative Rhetoric.” Federation Rhetoric Symposium. Denton, Texas. February 2002. ILL’d 1-28-09. 1-30-09 ILL cancelled – paper not published.

Carter, Stephen L. The Culture of Disbelief: How American Law and Politics Trivialize Religious Devotion. New York: Basic Books, 1993. Own copy. Cf Marsden saying same thing about secular university.

Cassity, Kathleen. “Exploring Religious Hybridity in the Writing Classroom.” Presented at CCCC 2008 in New Orleans. (F.30 “Writing Realities in “Paradise”: Real Students, Real Teachers). Cassity is at Hawaii Pacific University, Honolulu. ILL’d 1-28-09. ILL cancelled. CCC proceedings not published. Try contacting Cassity. kcassity@hpu.edu … research interests include “religion and identity” (HPU website). 2-7-09 Word, hard copy in file. See email. Basic thesis = we need to not give into sacred / secular binary.

Chappell, Virginia A. “Teaching — and Living — in the Meantime.” The Academy and the Possibility of Belief: Essays on the Intellectual and Spiritual Life. Eds. Mary Louise Buley-Meissner, Mary McCaslin Thompson, and Elizabeth Bachrach Tan. Cresskill, NJ: Hampton Press, 2000. 39-53. Hard copy in file.

Cohen, Samuel. “Composition and Construction: Belief, Identity, and the Teaching of Writing.” Dialogue: A Journal for Writing Specialists 6.1 (1999): 31-36. ISSN (printed): 1536-4240.  ILL’d 12-18-08. Pdf,  and hard copy in file. Filed with Browning. “Cohen tells the story of his experience as a non-believing Jew teaching orthodox Jews, and of the ways in which this kind of experience can be used to illustrate the social construction of ideas and identity” (from Intro to “Symposium…” p 7).

Crowley, Sharon. Toward a Civil Discourse: Rhetoric and Fundamentalism. U of Pittsburg P, 2006. own copy

Daniell, Beth. “Composing (as) Power” for “Interchanges: Spiritual Sites of Composing.” College Composition and Communication 45. 2 (May 1994): 238-246. Have hard copy of issue, filed under Berthoff. Abstract from Foehr and Schiller p 187: “In her study of the influence of writing on women in an Al-Anon program, Daniell examines how journals, letter writing, dream recording, and other forms of writing help the subjects to attain spiritual growth in dealing with or resolving personal conflicts.”

Darsey, James, and Joshua R. Ritter. “Religious Voices in American Public Discourse.” The SAGE Handbook of Rhetorical Studies. Ed. Andrea A. Lunsford et al. Los Angeles: SAGE, 2009: 553-585. Hard copy. See notes in “Introduction notes” file.

Diltz, Judith. “Writing as Threshold to Spirit: A Phenomenological Study of Writing of Twelve College Women.” (DAIA) 2007 July; 68 (1): 176. Union Institute and U, 2006. Abstract no: DA3248192. Found on EBSCO. No abstract. **NEED TO ORDER**

Dively, Ronda Leathers. “Beyond Dualism: Writing and Responding to Religious Rhetoric in the Freshman Composition Classroom.” Diss 1994 Illinois State University. Hard copy in three-ring binder.

The purpose of this research was to investigate the potential effects of a pedagogy designed to help students avoid dualistic modes of thought and expression when writing about religious subject matter. Specifically, the study focused on the following questions: 1) How might the nature of students’ attitudes toward, the process involved in, and the products elicited by engagement with a religious topic be characterized? 2) To what extent is it possible to help freshman composition students write about religious faith in an intellectually and rhetorically astute fashion as that is defined by appropriations of William Perry’s model of intellectual and ethical development of undergraduates for the composition classroom? 3) How might composition instructors successfully address the many problems which necessarily arise when helping students to write about religious values and experiences within forums (including the academy) composed of individuals who may not share their convictions?

The research pedagogy drew heavily on theories of audience and forum analysis, multiple subjectivity and the centripetal and centrifugal capacities of language. The potential effects of the pedagogy were investigated by means of preexperimental and case-study methodology. The primary data (collected from each of forty students in three separate classes) included two drafts written in response to an essay assignment on religion, one written before implementation of the pedagogy, and the second written after implementation of the pedagogy. Other data included questionaire responses, process journals, revisions plans and end-of-the-semester self-analyses.

The data led to the following conclusions: 1) The majority of students did not produce dualist initial response to the essay assignment on religion. 2) Some students involved in the preexperiement did improve the quality of their essay on religion after implementation of the pedagogy. 3) Case-study documents revelaed that the students’ attitude toward the assignment on religion were positive. 4) Case-study documents and students’ drafts suggested that certain aspects of the pedagogy were helpful in facilitating successful revision processes for the assignment on religion. 5) Many of the students experienced common difficulties when drafting the essay assignment on religion.

Dively, Ronda Leathers. “Censoring Religious Rhetoric in the Composition Classroom: What We and Our Students May Be Missing.” Composition Studies/Freshman English News, v25 n1 p55-66 Spr 1997 ILL’d 1-22-09. Pdf, and hard copy in file.
ABSTRACT: Notes that it is not unusual for writing teachers to place “religion” on lists of forbidden subject matter. Describes a two-year research project that developed and tested a pedagogy for responding to the unique problems that composition instructors face when intellectually and rhetorically unsophisticated religious texts do cross their desks. (RS)

Added 4-10-08 ABSTRACT: The purpose of this research was to investigate the potential effects of a pedagogy designed to help students avoid dualistic modes of thought and expression when writing about religious subject matter. Specifically, the study focused on the following questions: (1) How might the nature of students’ attitudes toward, the processes involved in, and the products elicited by engagement with a religious topic be characterized? (2) To what extent is it possible to help freshman composition students write about religious faith in an intellectually and rhetorically astute fashion as that is defined by appropriations of William Perry’s model of the intellectual and ethical development of undergraduates for the composition classroom? (3) How might composition instructors successfully address the many problems which necessarily arise when helping students to write about religious values and experiences within forums (including the academy) composed of individuals who may not share their convictions?

The research pedagogy drew heavily on theories of audience and forum analysis, multiple subjectivity and the centripetal and centrifugal capacities of language. The potential effects of the pedagogy were investigated by means of preexperimental and case-study methodology. The primary data (collected from each of forty students in three separate classes) included two drafts written in response to an essay assignment on religion, one written before implementation of the pedagogy, and the second written after implementation of the pedagogy. Other data included questionnaire responses, process journals, revision plans and end-of-the-semester self-analyses.

The data led to the following conclusions: (1) The majority of students did not produce dualistic initial responses to the essay assignment on religion. (2) Some students involved in the preexperiment did improve the quality of their essay on religion after implementation of the pedagogy. (3) Case-study documents revealed that the students’ attitudes toward the assignment on religion were positive. (4) Case-study documents and students’ drafts suggested that certain aspects of the pedagogy were helpful in facilitating successful revision processes for the assignment on religion. (5) Many of the students experienced common difficulties when drafting the essay assignment on religion.

Dively, Ronda Leathers. “Religious Discourse in the Academy: Creating a Space by Means of Poststructuralist Theories of Subjectivity.” Composition Studies. 21.2 (1993): 91-101. Summit’d 11-5-08. Hard copy in file.

“Unlike many of the other authors in this section, who analyze texts and theories through the lens of Christianity, Dively suggests that Christianity itself (as well as other religious faiths) must also undergo critical analysis in the classroom. Dively argues that instead of “ignoring” or “demeaning” religious beliefs as they surface in students’ writings and classroom talk, composition instructors should push students to interrogate their belief systems by theorizing “their own subjectivity as the product ot multiple interpellations rendered by various discourses and affiliations” so that students can “address complexity and conflict in their own writing about religious experience and a lot of other issues” (103).”

Abstract: Discusses the possibly embarrassing and awkward situation that results when a writing teacher must respond to student texts written from a religious perspective. Provides a theoretical basis that allows for teachers to encourage students to study and critique religious discourse in an academic manner.

Dively, Ronda Leathers. “The Religious Rhetor in the Secular Academy: Identifying and Transcending Discursive Boundaries.” Kansas English 81.2 (1996): 45-51. ILL’d 1-23-09. 1-30-09 rec’d. Pdf, and hard copy in file.

Downs, Douglas. “True Believers, Real Scholars, and Real True Believing Scholars: Discourses of Inquiry and Affirmation in the Composition Classroom.”  Negotiating Religious Faith in the Composition Classroom. Eds. Elizabeth Vander Lei and bonnie Lenore kyburz.  Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook, 2005. 39-56. Own book.

“Downs argue that religious discourse serves to AFFIRM beliefs and thus often shuts out meaningful dialogue with other ideas, but writing instructors should practice a commitment to inquiry, to valuing questioning and curiosity as a habit of mind. Thus, they should model and coach students with religious commitments in these epistemological practices so as to achieve the goals of composition without attemtping to disabuse students of their beliefs.”

Edler, Frank H.W. “Crossing the Great Divide Between Religious Fundamentalism and Critical Thinking.” 2004.  <http://commhum.mccneb.edu/PHILOS/Crossingthegreatdivide&gt; (Edler is a PhD who teaches in the communications and philosophy dept at Metropolitan Community College, Omaha, NE). Word, and hard copy in file.

Eubanks, Byron. “A Biblical Defense of Critical Thinking.” Critical Thinking and the Bible in the Age of New Media. Ed. Charles M. Ess. U P of America, 2004. 95-110. Hard copy in file.

Fell, Gilbert S. “Explorations Into Linguistic Practice as a Source of Religious Polarities, or the Inevitability of Ineffability.” Language in Religion. Eds Allison Armstrong [Keef?] and Humphrey Tonkin. Lanham: UP of America, 1989. 7-15. (in Dively 1997 works cited) ILL’d 1-23-09. Rec’d 1-26-09 Pdf, and hard copy in file.

Ferry, Christopher. “Liberation Theology and Liberatory Pedagogy: Spiritual Teaching in the Real World” in The Spiritual Side of Writing: Releasing the Learner’s Whole Potential. Eds. Susan A. Schiller and Regina Paxton Foehr. Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook, 1997. 148-156. Hard copy.

Fish, Stanley. “One University Under God?” The Chronicle of Higher Education January 7, 2005. C1, C4. http://chronicle.com/jobs/news/2005/01/2005010701c.htm  Word copy in file.

Fitzgerald, Lauren. “Torah U’Madda: Institutional “Mission” and Composition Instruction.”  Negotiating Religious Faith in the Composition Classroom. Eds. Elizabeth Vander Lei and bonnie Lenore kyburz.  Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook, 2005. 141-154. Own book.

France, Alan W. “Theology and Composition: Inscribing the Absent Other.” Composition as a Cultural Practice. Macedo, Donaldo, ed. Wesport, CT: Bergin & Garvey. 1994. page 139 Valley doesn’t have… can get through Summitt though. Ordered used copy via Amazon, to be sent to Yakima, 6-11-08.

Chapter 9 Theology and Composition: Inscribing the Absent Other

A social-materialist rhetoric, as sketched in the preceding chapter, focuses attention on the often unintentional work of the political unconscious. It is reasonable to infer that this unconscious shapes a culture’s most profound persuasion of what nature is (like) in ways compatible with existing social arrangements, which in turn come to seem “natural.” Western dualism, for example, insists on the discursive space of subject and object, self and the stuff of otherness. In this historical context, therefore, any reenvisioning of composition as a culturally subjective process must address the textual regulations for inscribing alterity at and beyond the limits of the material world, the meaning of the Other as a metaphysical complement of the Self. This chapter attempts to explore the theological ground rules–the code of presuppositions, or Burkean “god-terms”–that govern meaning making in the contemporary composition classroom.

The way I have been using the word “culture” up to this point assumes that discourses, in anthropologist Terence Turner’s words, “must be under¬stood and analyzed primarily as constituents of contextually and histori¬cally situated social interaction” (123). Repeatedly I have written here about institutional structures of discipline and authority (with a general but until now unacknowledged debt to Foucault) and of hegemonic social relations that mediate the material reproduction of wealth, privilege, and power. In this final chapter, however, I want to examine the cultural context of writing and writing pedagogy from what might well be considered an idealist, rather than a material, position. Such a point of view assumes that “individual tropes and symbols constitute the fundamental units or….

Gere, Ann Ruggles.  “Revealing Silence: Rethinking Personal Writing.”  CCC 53:2 (Dec. 2001): 203-223. (See Brandt)

“Gere contends that some students may choose to deal with personal issues in writing courses by opting not to talk about issues that are sensitive, private, or even difficult, and that instructors should not attempt to force students to communicate in ways that violate their sense of personal safety.  Her essay is also helpful for encouraging writing teachers to address and acknowledge the tacit character of religious commitments.”

Gilyard, Keith. Composition and Cornel West: Notes toward a Deep Democracy. Southern Illinois UP, 2008. Chapter “Tracking Prophetic Witness” compiles composition scholars views on religion in the writing classroom. Thanks, Michael!  Ordered via Summitt 11-1-08. Hard copy in file.

Composition and Cornel West: Notes toward a Deep Democracy identifies and explains key aspects of the work of Cornel West—the highly regarded scholar of religion, philosophy, and African American studies—as they relate to composition studies, focusing especially on three rhetorical strategies that West suggests we use in our questioning lives as scholars, teachers, students, and citizens.

In this study, author Keith Gilyard examines the strategies of Socratic Commitment (a relentless examination of received wisdom), Prophetic Witness (an abiding concern with justice and the plight of the oppressed), and Tragicomic Hope (a keep-on-pushing sensibility reflective of the African American freedom struggle). Together, these rhetorical strategies comprise an updated form of cultural criticism that West calls prophetic pragmatism.

Goodburn, Amy. “It’s a Question of Faith: Discourses of Fundamentalism and Critical Pedagogy in the Writing Classroom.” JAC: A Journal of Composition Theory (1998): 333-53. PE1001 .J681 v.18 (1998) . Hard copy in file. 2-28-09 Found pdf (saved in directory).

Groppe, John D. “The Writing Classroom as a Spiritual Site of Composing.” Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Conference on College Composition and Communication (46th, Washington, DC, March 23-25, 1995). ILL’d 1-17-09. 1-20-09  Notified it’s available “full-text in the ERIC microfiche on the 3rd floor of the library.  The call number is ED 382 993.”

ABSTRACT: The academic setting for many students is frightening, but it is especially so for students with a strong religious background. For such students, the academic atmosphere is, at best, not neutral but empty of teachers and classes that would encourage them to deepen their religious resources. In a “Point of View” essay in the “Chronicle of Higher Education,” Professor Robert N. Sollod called the current curriculum of American colleges and universities “the hollow curriculum” as “American universities now largely ignore religion and spirituality.” That may be the best situation religious students encounter. More often they encounter an environment hostile to religion. What writing instructors, especially, must do at this junction is learn how to deal with ideas and experiences that are vital to a good number of their constituents. They must recognize and appreciate the range and variety of verbal forms that reflect and constitute what William James called the varieties of religious experience. Prophetic discourse would be one of these verbal forms. The prophetic genre is both a crystallization of and the impetus for such forms as personal testimonies or autobiographies, lyrical meditation, and songs that appropriate or develop religious symbols. Expressive discourse can be used as a means of building the kind of premises and connections among a group of students that is necessary for good persuasive discourse. Contains seven references. (TB)

Hairston, M. “Diversity, Ideology, and Teaching Writing.” College Composition and Communication, 1992, 43, 179–193. Hard copy in file. See responses to Hairston in CCC 44.2 (May 1993) [have copy of issue in file]. “It’s worth noting here that religion plays an important role in the lives of man of our students — and many of us, I”m sure — but it’s a dimension almost never mentioned by those who talk about cultural diversity and difference. In most classrooms in which there is an obvious political agenda, students — even graduate students — are very reluctant to reveal their religious beliefs, sensing they may get a hostile reception. And with reason — remember the quotation from David Bleich. But a teacher who believes in diversity must pay attention to and respect students with deep religious convinctions, not force them too into silence” (191).

Handelman, Susan. “‘Knowledge Has a Face’: The Jewish, the Personal, and the Pedagogical.” in Personal Effects: The Social Character of Scholarly Writing. Ed by D. Holdstein and D. Bleich, 121-44. Logan, UT: Utah State UP, 2001. (Referenced in Rand’s Introduction to Negotiating…) In Valley PE1404 .P457 2001 but checked out until june 09.  ILL’d 1-22-09. Rec’d 1-26-09. Pdf, and hard copy in file.

Handelman, Susan.  “Emunah: The Craft of Faith.” The Academy and the Possibility of Belief: Essays on the Intellectual and Spiritual Life. Eds. Mary Louise Buley-Meissner, Mary McCaslin Thompson, and Elizabeth Bachrach Tan. Cresskill, NJ: Hampton Press, 2000. 85-104. [originally published in 1992 in Cross Currents]. Hard copy in file.

Hansen, Kristine. “Religious Freedom in the Public Square and the Composition Classroom.”  Negotiating Religious Faith in the Composition Classroom. Eds. Elizabeth Vander Lei and bonnie Lenore kyburz.  Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook, 2005. 24-38. (own book and have pdf). See Vanderlei and Fitzergerald 2007, p. 191 — mentions Hansen.

“Hansen looks to American political history as a means of arguing that writing instructors actually encourage civility when they allow students with religious commitments to speak and write openly about those commitments. Her essay provides a broad, civic-based perspective for dealing with religious faith in the writing classroom.”

Holmes, Arthur F. The Idea of a Christian College. Revised Edition. Eerdmans, 1975. Have own copy.  See Perkins: “The Idea […] offer[s] relevant insights for secular teachers who wish to help evangelical students develop critical thinking skills without undermining their Christian cultural identities” (598). “A foundational text that establishes the positive roles liberal education can play in the spiritual and intellectual development of evangelical Christians.”

Hudson, Deal W. “Thinking about God: to find a free and able mind, look for a believer, not a relativist skeptic – Back to School.” National Review September 30, 1996. Pdf, and hard copy in file. http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1282/is_n18_v48/ai_18738566.  See Shannon Carter’s English 101 syllabus. Carter: “Whereas Johnson argues that religious faith and the capacity for critical thought cannot coexist, Hudson believes that faith is a necessary prerequisite to critical thought.”

Johnson, Margaret E. “Silenced by Religion: Reflections On Situations From College English.” The CEA Forum 37.1 (Winter/Spring 2008). <http://www2.widener.edu/~cea/371johnson.htm&gt;. (accessed 2-19-09) Word and hard copy in file.

Johnson, Peggy, and Mike Mutschelknaus. “Disembodied Spirituality: Conflicts in the Writing Center.” Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Conference on College Composition and Communication (52nd, Denver, Colorado, March 14-17, 2001). Pdf, and hard copy in file.

Johnson, Robert. “Teaching the Forbidden: Literature and the Religious Student.” ADE Bulletin 112, Winter 1995, pp. 37-39. http://web2.ade.org/ade/bulletin/n112/112037.htm  Word, and hard copy in file. [Also rpt. in Transitions: Writing, Researching, Reflecting. Donna Dunbar-Odom. Southlake, TX: Fountainhead P, 71-77.] Shannon Carter, in her English 101 Syllabus (2006) says,  “Johnson contends that deep religious faith interferes with a student’s ability to think critically and perform well in the college classroom.”

kyburz, bonnie lenore and Elizabeth Vander Lei, eds. Negotiating Religious Faith in the Composition Classroom. Boynton/Cook, 2005. (own book) “Religious faith may seem to be so personal that it has no place in the composition classroom. But Negotiating Religious Faith in the Composition Classroom demonstrates the myriad and profound ways that religious faith shapes the work of composition students and instructors, whether or not they are believers. Elizabeth Vander Lei and bonnie kyburz invite you to consider anew how religious faith can help writers and teachers accomplish the goals of composition by addressing questions…”

kyburz, bonnie lenore. “Liminal Performances, Discursive Practices: Introductory Comments.”  Negotiating Religious Faith in the Composition Classroom. Eds. Elizabeth Vander Lei and bonnie Lenore kyburz.  Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook, 2005. 59-62. Own book.

kyburz, bonnie lenore. “Religious Faith in Context — Institutions, Histories, Identities Bodies: Introductory Comments”  Negotiating Religious Faith in the Composition Classroom. Eds. Elizabeth Vander Lei and bonnie Lenore kyburz.  Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook, 2005. 137-140. Own book.

Lazere, Donald. “Rethinking Progressive Pedagogy.” Radical Teacher 77 (2006): 20-24. Pdf, Word, and hard copy in file. Mentioned in Cassity intro.

Lewis, Paul. “A Generation of Prophets: The Writing Teacher and the Freshman Mystic.” CCC 1975 Oct; 26 (3): 289-92 PE1001 .C6. Hard copy in file.  SUMMARY:  Describes and tries to provide pedagogical advice for working with students (of the early 1970s) who write overly abstract, imprecise descriptions of their mystical experiences. Lewis points out, as many have, that “the more intense the experience under discussion was, the more difficult it will be to communicate a sense of that experience in writing” (289). Cf C Anderson. Cf ineffability of religious / spiritual experience / language. The “freshman mystical writer” falls into three traps: 1) tells experience without showing it; 2) uses too-vague language (cf Linda Flower’s “code words”); and 3) “employs bizarre and trite phrases” (cf Lindholm’s “Listening, Learning, and the Language of Faith” in which she talks about Evangelical language / phrases). cf Jon Ritz 1999 “Spirituality and the Personal Essay”.

Lindholm, Jeannette M. “Listening, Learning, and the Language of Faith.” The Academy and the Possibility of Belief: Essays on the Intellectual and Spiritual Life. Eds. Mary Louise Buley-Meissner, Mary McCaslin Thompson, and Elizabeth Bachrach Tan. Cresskill, NJ: Hampton Press, 2000. 55-67. Hard copy in file.

Marsden, George M. The Outrageous Idea of Christian Scholarship. New York: Oxford, 1997. 142 pages. BT738.17 .M37 1997. Chapter one, “Why Christian Perspectives are Not Welcomed” — hard copy in file.

Marsden, George. The Soul of the American University: From Protestant Establishment to Established Nonbelief. New York: Oxford, 1994. LA226 .M34 1994. Looked at 1-15-09, decided didn’t need; could use summary articles Marsden himself wrote.

Marsden, George M. “The Soul of the American University: A Historical Overview.” The Secularization of the Academy. George M. Marsden and Bradley J. Longfield, eds. New York: Oxford UP, 1992. 9-45. 1-16-09 Hard copy in file (or soon will be).

Marsden, George. “Why the academy should include religious perspectives.” Academic Questions 9.2 (June 1996): 10-16. Category: Symposium: God in the academy. Pdf and hard copy in file.

Amazon.com Review: The Outrageous Idea of Christian Scholarship, by George Marsden, is a short, forceful argument by a leading religious historian that the secular academy can and should be more open to faith-based scholarship. Marsden brings his considerable knowledge of fundamentalist and evangelical history to bear on the questions that face Christian students and teachers in mainstream universities: Is it better to stay quiet about faith? What will colleagues think of professors who talk about their religious beliefs in class? What kinds of knowledge are best illuminated by religious reflection? Marsden’s main goal is practical, and the best parts of this book give advice about how Christian academics can connect with and encourage one another. He also points readers toward the work of a few academics who, Marsden argues, do topnotch research that also brings glory to God. –Michael Joseph Gross –This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Kirkus Reviews: A frank assertion that religious faith does indeed have a place in academia. Marsden (History/Notre Dame) is an influential, perceptive scholar of American religion. Fundamentalism and American Culture (1980), his landmark study, stands as the definitive intellectual history of conservative evangelicalism. He argues here that the academy has trivialized religious faith to the extent that scholars feel compelled to check their belief systems at the door. Marsden admits that he is entering new territory here: This book is not a work of history, but a plea for scholars of faith to take a bold initiative in connecting their beliefs to their disciplines. This clarifies and expands upon a similar suggestion made in his controversial 1994 book, The Soul of the American University. Scholars rejected many of that work’s ideas, expressing the suspicion that, if ultraconservative Christians were permitted to do so, they would not merely incorporate faith into their disciplines but seize control of education, demand equal time for such dubious pursuits as “creation science,” and stifle alternative religious viewpoints. Marsden insists that this is not what he had in mind and that his vision of “faith-informed scholarship” requires scholars to play by the rules of the academy, rules that include accepting diverse perspectives. If there is a flaw in this short volume, it is that Marsden spends more time answering his critics and defining what faith-informed scholarship is not than in delineating what it might have to offer. His vision is also specifically Christian. Marsden says that he hopes that scholars of other faiths will join his crusade and integrate their beliefs with their work, and he repeatedly asserts that his goal is not to return American education to an old-time Protestant hegemony. This book will prompt more heated debate about the role of religion in the academy. And despite Marsden’s eloquence, the jury is still out on this divisive question.

McCrary, Donald. “Womanist Theology and Its Efficacy for the Writing Classroom.” CCC 52.4 (2001): 521-552. Pdf, and hard copy in file. ABSTRACT: Analyzing postmodern theory, course discussion, and student texts, this article argues that womanist theology and the texts it gathers can serve as efficacious course content for other-literate students. Womanist theology offers students a scholarly discipline that expresses inter- and intracultural rhetorical awareness, bridging the gap between home and school literacy functions.

CONCLUDING PARAGRAPH: “My idea of using womanist theology in the writing classroom is to provide students with an accessible discourse and hermeneutic that challenges and critiques oppressive rhetoric both inside and outside the academy and that helps students to generate a rhetoric of their own that illustrates their competence as transcultural thinkers and writers. Womanist theology as hermeneutic practice might help my students understand the ideological power behind interpretation, including the power of the knowing interpreter to inscribe subjectivity and centrality.”

McGuire, Vail H. Unlikely Connections: The Intersection of Composition, Rhetoric, and Christian Theology. Diss. Doctor of Philosophy, Miami University, English, 2007. Ill’d 4-11-08 297763.  Have hard copy in three-ring binder. ABSTRACT: The discipline of composition and rhetoric and the discipline of theology, particularly Christian theology, are two areas which have often found themselves distanced from one another, especially as they are positioned both within the academy and the composition classroom. Because the epistemological orientations of these two disciplines are often perceived as so dissimilar, the discipline of composition and rhetoric has been remarkably disinclined to include theology and religion among its many theoretical tributaries. In addition, composition pedagogy often conduces to a more liberal sociopolitical orientation, thus promoting further distance between the composition teacher and the conservative Christian student. The purpose for this paper, therefore, is twofold: first, to promote greater awareness among the professionals in my discipline of the contiguity which exists between composition and rhetoric and contemporary theology. There are conversations that are currently taking place regarding how to appropriate religious faith into the composition classroom in pedagogically productive and meaningful ways, but they are not addressing the issue within a theological context. Thus, the second objective is to address the following question: How might rhetoric and composition be informed by contemporary theology? In answering this question, it is important to recognize that Christianity is neither a coherent nor a monolithic cultural identity, something that will be examined at length. In addition, an exploration of the theologies of Trinitarian doctrine and of evangelism reveals how they might speak to the issues of subjectivity, ontology, and social construction, discussions which, in turn, suggest how theology can both inform and transform classroom practices.

Metts, Wally. “Tips for Teaching English to Religious Fanatics.” English Journal March 1981. (Stuchel mentions / respond to.) Hard copy in file.

Miller, Hildy. “Goddess Spirituality and Academic Knowledge-Making.” The Academy and the Possibility of Belief: Essays on the Intellectual and Spiritual Life. Eds. Mary Louise Buley-Meissner, Mary McCaslin Thompson, and Elizabeth Bachrach Tan. Cresskill, NJ: Hampton Press, 2000. 69-84. Hard copy in file.

Miller, Keith D., and Jennifer M. Santos. “Recomposing Religious Plotlines.”  Negotiating Religious Faith in the Composition Classroom. Eds. Elizabeth Vander Lei and bonnie Lenore kyburz.  Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook, 2005. 63-83. Own book. CATEGORY 3

Moffett, James. “Censorship and Spiritual Education” in The Right to Literacy, ed. Andrea Lunsford et al. MLA, 1990. Own book. CATEGORY 1

Moffett, James. “Soul School” in The Spiritual Side of Writing: Releasing the Learner’s Whole Potential, Eds Regina Paxton Foehr and Susan A. Schiller. Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook, 1997. 5-14. hard copy in file. Moffett “offers a spiritual framework for re-visioning education and teaching the whole person.” ( 2 from intro)

Moffett, James. “Responses” in “Interchanges: Spiritual Sites of Composing” College Composition and Communication 45.2 (1994): 258-263. Have copy of issue, filed under Berthoff. [Also have pdf just of Moffett — in hard copy in file under Moffett]

Moore, Mary Elizabeth. Teaching from the Heart: Theology and Educational Method. Fortress Press, 1991. Summit-ed 3-13-09. Have Summit copy till 4-30-09. Ordered own copy via amazon 4-4-09.    CF TO CROWLEY!! heart and mind, pathos and logos

Amazon reviewer: Moore’s book speaks to the heart, offering the piece that seems to be missing, particularly in Christian Education but perhaps from education in general. As with the work of Parker Palmer, Moore proposes that for true education and understanding to take place, the teaching and the “knowing” must come from the heart as well as the mind. Recognizing that real knowledge is more than just mind knowledge is vital. In her own words, Moore works to build “a bridge” between theology and educational theory. She argues seriously and effectively that theology and education must work in relationship to each other. Moore presents five accepted educational methods (case study, Gestalt, phenomenological, narrative and conscientizing) and looks at each of them in light of process theology. She competently discusses the strengths and weaknesses of each, offering practical ideas as to how each of these might be re-thought AND used in ways that allow for “teaching from the heart” and for standing in relationship WITH theology. Wonderfully thorough and yet readable for the “average” educator, this book is highly recommended, a must read for any Christian Educator, if not all educators.

Montesano, Mark, and Duane Roen. “Religious Faith, Learning, and Writing: Challenges in the Classroom.”  Negotiating Religious Faith in the Composition Classroom. Eds. Elizabeth Vander Lei and bonnie Lenore kyburz.  Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook, 2005. 84-98. Own book.  CATEGORY 1 and 2?

Nash, Robert J. Religious Pluralism in the Academy: Opening the Dialogue. New York: Peter Lang, 2001. (See review by Michael D. Waggoner in Anglican Theological Review Fall 2002 (copy in “Articles” directory)). Ordered via summitt 10-18-08. Hard copy in file.

Neuleib, Janice. “Spilt Religion: Student Motivation and Values-Based Writing.” Writing on the Edge (WOE) 4.1 (Fall 1992). 41-50. ILL’d 1-23-09. Pdf, and hard copy in file.  See notes in directory and on blog. CATEGORY 2

cf. Crowley. “To be dispassionate and logical is to be dispossessed of the necessary connections with the compelling experiences that focus and motivate our writing” (46).

Neuleib draws on Jim Porter‘s call for revival of ETHOS [“Values are rooted in experiences and our interpretations of those experiences. The writer / rhetor can only discover and interpret those values by writing through the issues that deeply move and motivate and, i would add, by doing so invigorate the writing experience itself”] and James Zebroski‘s “six ways in which he continues to interrogate his own teaching… [doubt, resistance, skepticism, “study up” anthropology, literacy and power as public issues, and narrative]. Neuleib describes her experience being a “table leader” at an English examination, the way her graders wanted to grade down students who used religious language [to a question that ask a basically religious question! in this case], and the way in which her advice to them to translate the students religious language / phrases with “self-awareness” and “personal knowledge” enabled the readers “to see the writer as a person with an idea that might qualify for a middle score” (43).

RELIGION, EMOTION, and FLOW. Neuleib draws on Csikszentmihalyi’s to remind us of the importance of emotion in good writing, in “flow” (44).  “He found that writers in English classes unfortunately do not often epxerience such conditions [wherein self-consciousness disappears, concentration intsense, excellent flow…]. I would speculate that the rules against emotionally-packed expression in school might inhibit students’ discovery that writing can produce optimal experience” (44).  Neuleib then goes on to distinguish between the flow produced by philosophical and value questions, the latter providing a “different level of intellectual excitment” (45).

“VALUES VERSUS VISIONS”.  “I think that the readers at my table responded negatively to student AP writers who talked about Jesus because both the readers and writers had confused rules with values and routine with ritual, perhaps because we are unsure of our values and have so few really effective rituals in our culture.  To return once again to Csikszentmihalyi, optimal religious experience tends to be lacking in our culture, except perhaps at rock concerts, symphonies, or among the few mystics experiencing the mythic power of ritual. Since we have little experience of the ritualistic ecstacy, Csil.. describes in other cultures, we tend to see religion either as keeping the social order or as comforting (or boring, depending on one’s perspective) repetition” (46).  […] “I want to meet students where they stand on values but move them toward a perspective that can enrich both their writing and their ability to articulate the sources of their values” (46).

Nowacek, Rebecca Schoenike. “Negotiating Individual Religious Identity and Institutional Religious Culture.”  Negotiating Religious Faith in the Composition Classroom. Eds. Elizabeth Vander Lei and bonnie Lenore kyburz.  Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook, 2005. 155-166. Own book.

O’Reilley, Mary Rose. The Peaceable Classroom. Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook Heinemann, 1993. Own copy. O’Reilley starts with the question, “How can we teach a class in a way that would encourage no more wars?” Narrative of her development of a peaceable classroom, “one that honors learners and teachers alike”… a journey that honors “spiritual and ethical teaching” (from Foehr and Schiller p199).

Peele, Tom. “Writing about Faith: Mainstream Music and Composition.” http://www.boisestate.edu/english/tpeele/faithandmusic/index.html  CATEGORY 3
From his introduction: Since many of us in composition argue that we should value our students’ knowledges and experiences, and contextualize our study of writing within the various discourse communities that students inhabit, I propose that including the subjects of faith and religion in our curricula offers many students, both religious and non-religious, powerful rhetorical and affective grounds from which to write.

Penti, Marsha. “Religious Identities in the Composition Class: Learning From Students of Difference” Diss. Michigan Technical U, 1998. ILL’d 6-5-09. Reference in Dale Sullivan’s “Beyond Discourse Communities” (1999). Can’t believe I didn’t find this source until today!

“Though difficult to access, this dissertation has been referenced by various writers on the subject of religious faith in the composition classroom.  Penti seems to have been one of the first scholars to identify students with religious commitments as “students of difference,” students who do not easily fit into academic models of personal identity.”

Perkins, Priscilla. “‘A Radical Conversion of the Mind’: Fundamentalism, Hermeneutics, and the Metanoic Classroom.”  College English 63.5 (2001): 585-611. Pdf and hard copy in file.
Perkins contrasts the relative value of rhetorical and hermeneutical instruction for fundamentalist Christian students. She makes a detailed claim for the effectiveness of hermeneutical metanoia in the composition classroom.

“Perkins explores the collision between critical theory and the fundamentalist discourse of some student writers, and she offers practical means of encouraging students to adapt their interpretive practices to engage “dangerous texts” with sophistication and openness rather than closed-minded resistance.”

Peters, Brad. “African American Students of Faith in the Writing Center: Facilitating a Rhetoric of Conscience.”  Negotiating Religious Faith in the Composition Classroom. Eds. Elizabeth Vander Lei and bonnie Lenore kyburz.  Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook, 2005. 121-134. Own book. ” Brad Peters… introduces a rhetoric that allows students to be faithful to not only scholarship but also their cultures and religions. Peters is especially concerned that students be given more chances to practice melding cultural and academic literacies (131).”

Powers, Peter Kerry. “A Clash of Civilizations: Religious and Academic Discourse in the English Classroom.” Profession (2008): 66–73. ILL’d 2-28-09. Keywords: English literature; 1500-1999; American literature; religious beliefs; academic discourse; pedagogical approach; teaching of literature; teaching and learning contexts; student characteristics. DOI: 10.1632/prof.2008.2008.1.66. ISSN: 0740-6959. Rec’d pdf 3-3-09. Need to print. BACKGROUND

Puccio, Paul. “The Contemplative Classroom.” Dialogue: A Journal for Writing Specialists 6.1 (1999): 37-48. ISSN (printed): 1536-4240. ILL’d 12-18-08. Hard copy in file.

Rand, Lizabeth A. “Enacting Faith: Evangelical Discourse and the Discipline of Composition Studies.” College Composition and Communication 52.3 (Feb 2001): 349-367.Pdf, hard copy. CATEGORY 1 and 2

ABSTRACT: This essay contends that religious belief often matters to our students and that spiritual identity may be the primary kind of selfhood that more than a few of them draw upon in making meaning of their lives and the world around them. Particular attention is given to evangelical expression in the classroom and the complex ways that faith is enacted in discourse. ABSTRACT: “Rand calls on composition instructors to critically examine the discourses chosen by their evangelical Christian students. She claims that writing teachers can improve their pedagogy by “start[ing] with the premise that evangelical discourse may reflect an oppositional and critically resistant stance” instead of assuming that it is necessarily anti-intellectual (363). Without personally promoting Christianity, Rand successfully argues for a space for distinctly Christian student rhetoric in composition classrooms.”

“Nothing less than a watershed essay in the field of composition and rhetoric, this essay argues that students often take issues related to faith and religion far more seriously than their writing teachers.  Rand asserts that scholarship has often devalued religious discourse as it relates to student writing and that the field would do well to identify religious discourse as a viable Other alongside the marginalized discourses to which we offer more theoretical deference.”

Ranieri, P.W., and J. Dubinsky. “What Makes Collaboration Work: Cooperation, Care, and Respect.” Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association For General and Liberal Studies. San Antonio, TX, October 1995. Discussed briefly in Speck 1996 — Ranieri and Dubinsky did study on Christian students’ perception of their reception in the classroom; emailed Ranieri asking for copy of paper 7-9-09.

Ritchie, Joy. “Connecting Writers’ Roles to Social Roles beyond the Classroom.” Writing and Sense of Self: Identity Negotiation in Writing Workshops. Ed. Robert E. Brooke. NCTE, 1991. Discussed in Penti 28 ff. Not in Valley; summit-ed 7-5-09. Copied.

Ritz, Jon. “Spirituality and the Personal Essay: Pedagogical Perspectives.” Dialogue: A Journal for Writing Specialists 6.1 (1999): 23-30. ISSN (printed): 1536-4240.  ILL’d 12-18-08. Pdf, and hard copy in file (filed with Browning). CATEGORY 2 and 3?

Rothgery, David. “’So What Do We Do Now?’: Necessary Directionality as the Writing Teacher’s Response to Racist, Sexist, Homophobic Papers” CCC 44.2 (May 1993): 241-247. Hard copy. CATEGORY 1

Schiller, Susan A., and Regina Paxton Foehr. The Spiritual Side of Writing: Releasing the Learner’s Whole Potential. Boynton/Cook, 1997. Available Valley LB1027 .S67 199.

We have all experienced spiritual empowerment in learning. It may come in the form of a sudden insight or seemingly magical awareness; in an instant we reach a level of understanding that evokes feelings of joy, wonder, and a renewal of energy. It surprises, assures, and transforms us. It makes us want to know more.

The Spiritual Side of Writing helps teachers and students to achieve that level of understanding–to discover ways to tap the inner power inherent to us all. Through its fifteen essays by best-selling authors, composition specialists, and classroom teachers, it demonstrates the transcendent and egalitarian nature of spirituality and learning, allowing us to reenter the place where insights become illuminated, where the difficult becomes clear, where complex details melt into wholes.

Foehr and Schiller assert that spiritually open pedagogy is a choice that can reintroduce balance and, at the same time, foster lifelong learning. To them and their contributors, critical thinking and spirituality are not mutually exclusive but mutually intertwined. They view intellectual argument and the interpersonal exchange of ideas as some of the highest forms of spiritual empowerment, capable of filling students with wonder, exhilaration, and an awe for learning. Those interchanges give students a new vision of their own power to understand and create meaning.

The Spiritual Side of Writing will inspire all teachers, especially those at the college level. It will invoke renewed hope not only for their classes but for the world as well.

About the Author: Susan A. Schiller is an associate professor of English at Central Michigan University, where she also serves as director of composition. Her research interests include spirituality, affect, and images.

Schiller, Susan. “Writing: A Natural Site for Spirituality” in The Spiritual Side of Writing: Releasing the Learner’s Whole Potential. Eds. Regina Paxton Foehr and Susan A. Schiller. Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook, 1997. 34-43. hard copy. “Susan Schiller believes composition instruction can be improved by integrating spirituality-based pedagogy with composition theory. She points out that since professional writers frequently draw from their spirituality in order to create and find expression, so too can students in composition classes. By practicing a spirituality-based approach to composition, the academy can participate in and contribute to the whole-transition shift in reliaty that seems to be occurring.” (from p2-3 of Schiller and Foehr)

Schwen, Mark. Exiles From Eden: Religion and the Academic Vocation in America. Oxford UP, 1992. Ordered a used copy via amazon 5-17-09. Groppe (2-3) briefly discusses. Lindholm (58) also briefly discusses. Also have a review of this book.

Lindholm 58: “Like Palmer, Schwehn opts for a more “communitarian” vision of academic life, one that both nurtures shared quests for truth that are “linked inextricably to care taken with the lives and thoughts of others (p. 44)”  Charity/love — critical for listening and respectful dialogue.  (This is all in contrast to any possibility or desirability of objectifying knowledge, “of separating the knower from the known.” Love needs to be the “center of any educational endeavor, for the presence of love brings us closer to understanding the questions or answers we pursue and liberates learners themselves” (58). Nice.

“Spiritual Geography: Perspectives of Feminist Theologians” Cross Currents (Summer 1998). http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m2096/is_n2_v48/ai_20968464/print?tag=artBody;col1 (See section by Liz Nutting called “Who is the feminist theologian when she’s teaching freshman composition?”) See “Articles” directory on harddrive.

Shafer, Gregory. “A Christian Fundamentalist in a Reader-Response Class: Merging Transactions and Convictions.” TETYC 34.3 (March 2007): 320-331. Pdf and hard copy in file. “The author discusses his goal to imbue more reader-response criticism into a religious student’s language experience.” CATEGORY 1

ABSTRACT. There is something very democratic and creative about reader-response criticism. In a reader-response classroom, students progress from passive to active reading, from discovering a text to creating one. Also, students progress from passive to active reading, from discovering a text to creating one. However, a problem emerges when the spirit and empowerment of a reader-response approach seems to be truncated or undermined by deeply entrenched beliefs–beliefs that seem to negate other aspects of the student’s persona. In this article, the author relates how he once struggled to assist a student who seemed to be divorced from the dynamic reading experience that yields both personal and critical responses to a text. Danielle, the author’s student, seemed unable to tap into the mosaic of ideas that constitute an empowered transaction with a text because of her religious heritage. Whether the discussion revolved around a woman’s place in the home or the policy toward gay and lesbian marriage, Danielle appeared to rely on the perspective of her religious teachings and specifically the Bible in all of her opinions. The author relates how he was able to acknowledge Danielle’s right to her religion while being successful in encouraging her to consider other perspectives toward her reading and writing as well.

Smart, Juanita M. “Frankenstein or Jesus Christ?” When the Voice of Faith Creates a Monster for the Composition Teacher.” Negotiating Religious Faith in the Composition Classroom. Eds. Elizabeth Vander Lei and bonnie Lenore kyburz.  Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook, 2005. 11-23. Own book.

Sollod, Robert N. “The Hollow Curriculum.” The Academy and the Possibility of Belief: Essays on Intellectual and Spiritual Life. Eds. Mary Louise Buley-Meisnner, Mary McCaslin Thompson, and Elizabeth Bachrach Tan. Cresskill, New Jersey: Hampton Press, 2000. 13-16. Hard copy in file. BACKGROUND.

Solvang, Elna K. “Thinking Developmentally: The Bible, the First-Year College Student, and Diversity.” Teaching Theology and Religion 7.4 (2004): 223-229. Pdf, and hard copy in file. Use in CONCLUSION — “areas for further research” — section (as an example of the help we can get from religious studies and theology teachers).

Speck, B. W. “Professor Bias, Religion, and ESL Students: The Need for a Reflective Pedagogy.” College Student Journal, 1996, 30, 390–397. Word and hard copy in file.

FROM CONCLUSION: If professors remain uninformed about other religions, particularly when they are teaching nonnative speakers, they may inadvertently abuse academic freedom by claiming to be open-minded, i.e., willing to listen and learn, but playing the bigot in whatever form. That is tantamount to negating academic freedom. Again, perhaps inadvertently, for professors to abuse academic freedom in the name of truth to is to put students in the unfair position of either unfaithfully bowing to authority for the sake of avoiding a bad grade or of standing in open antagonism to the teacher’s authority. In the long term, professors cannot afford to set up such antagonisms in the classroom if professors seek to influence society positively by encouraging the pursuit of wisdom. In particular, professors should consider the necessity of dealing fairly with religion where ESL students are concerned because ESL students are one of the university’s most important imports and exports. The reputation of the academy is spread throughout the world by nonnative speakers who come to this country to get what they perceive to be one of the finest educations available. Professors should not be culpable of sullying that deserved reputation by perpetuating but another form of the Ugly American.

Speck, Bruce W. “Respect for Religious Differences: The Case of Muslim Students.” New Directions for Teaching and Learning 70 (Summer 1997): 39-46. Pdf and hard copy.  Speck is prof of English and coordinator of WAC program at U of Memphis.

Stenberg, Shari J. “Liberation Theology and Liberatory Pedagogies: Renewing the Dialogue.” College English 68 (2006): 271-90. Hard copy in file.

Stolley, Karl Andrew. “Toward a Conception of Religion as a Discursive Formation: Implications for Postmodern Composition Theory.” M.A. Thesis, Purdue University, 2002. http://karlstolley.com/cv/ ILL’d 1-17-09. Copied and put in white binder.  CATEGORY 1

Stuchel, Victoria S. “Teaching English when YOU are a Religious Fanatic” English Journal 71.5 (Sept 1982): 32-33. “Supports teaching literature from a religious point of view.”

Sullivan, Dale. “Beyond Discourse Communities: Orthodoxies and the Rhetoric of Sectarianism.” Rhetoric Review 18.1 (1999): 148-164. Stolley examins. CATEGORY 1. Pdf and hard copy in file.

“Sullivan gives careful attention to the presuppositions and rhetorical aspects of sectarian discourse, analyzing how various religious orthodoxies constitute “meaning systems,” rhetorical and epistemological means of making sense of the world.  She contends that even though sectarian discourse is often hostile to others, writing teachers should create avenues by which students with such “meaning systems” may communicate effectively and learn from others.”

Swearingen, Jan C. “”Doubting and Believing: The Hermeneutics of Suspicion in Contexts of Faith.” Journal of the Assembly for Expanded Perspectives on Learning 3 (1997-1998 Winter 1997): 13-22. Ill’d 06-27-08. (Michael told me about it.) Received electronic copy 07-10-08. “A belief-centered pedagogy helps students infuse cultural values into adversarial modes of academic writing.” CATEGORY 2 (and 3?)

Swearingen, Jan. “The Hermeneutics of Suspicion and Other Doubting Games: Clearing the Way for Simple Leaps of Faith.” The Academy and the Possibility of Belief: Essays on the Intellectual and Spiritual Life. Eds. Mary Louise Buley-Meissner, Mary McCaslin Thompson, and Elizabeth Bachrach Tan. Cresskill, NJ: Hampton Press, 2000. 137-152. Hard copy in file. SEE ABOVE

Swearingen, C. Jan. “Women’s Ways of Writing, or, Images, Self-Images, and Graven Images” in “Interchanges: Spiritual Sites of Composing.” College Composition and Communication 45.2 (May 1994): 251-258. Have copy of issue, filed under Berthoff. “Swearingen and two others conducted summer workshops in a week-long format that invoked religious faith and spirituality as a means to stimulate creativity.” (from Foehr and Schiller p 204)

Thompson, Deanna A. “As if Religion Matters: Teaching the Introductory Course as if it Does.” Teaching Theology and Religion 6.2 (2003): 85-92. Hard copy in file. BACKGROUND

Timmerman, John H., and Donald R. Hettinga. In the World: Reading and Writing as a Christian. Baker, 2004. 2nd ed. Ordered used copy via Amazon 3-4-09. Quoted by Perkins 606.  READER / COMP ANTHOLOGY

Trapp, Joonna. “Religious Values and the Student: A Plea for Tolerance” Dialogue: A Journal for Writing Specialists 6.1 (Fall 1999): 14-22. ISSN (printed): 1536-4240. ILL’d 12-18-08. Pdf, and hard copy in file. CATEGORY 2. Identity theory, home discourse, etc. BRIDGING.

Trainor, Jennifer. Seibel. “Critical Pedagogy’s “Other”: Constructions of Whiteness in Education for Social Change.” CCC 53.4 (June 2002): 631-650. Pdf and hard copy in file. (use as a kind of model?)

Traubitz, Nancy, Steven Hind, Lee Ellen Brasseur, and Helen Heightsman Gordon. “Facets: Religion in the Classroom.” The English Journal 72.5 (Sep., 1983): 18-21. Hard copy in file.  Filed under “Facets”

Trelstad, Marit.  “The Ethics of Effective Teaching: Challenges from the Religious Right and Critical Pedagogy.” Teaching Theology & Religion 11.4 (Oct 2008): 191-202. Ill’d 1-16-09. Hard copy in file. Pdf.

ABSTRACT: This essay asks: What are the ethics of engaging self-identified “conservative” students in topics and processes of learning that may unravel their world-view and possibly their personal lives? We should take their concerns, fear, and distrust seriously and not simply dismiss them as ignorant. We should strive to be “trustworthy” educators, guiding students through the consequences of transformative education. This paper argues that conservative students are critically examining and reacting to the liberal academy by leveling critiques similar to those found within feminist, post-colonial and post modern pedagogies. This essay reviews contemporary postmodern, postcolonial, and feminist pedagogies, which analyze bias and power in the classroom and have sought to represent marginalized voices in the classroom in order to challenge the way education often simply serves and protects the interests of the privileged. Pedagogies centered on subject or disciplinary method cannot secure a trustworthy pedagogy since method, thinking skills, and subjects are themselves bias-laden. But critical pedagogy offers insights to help us achieve the goal of becoming trustworthy educators for students coming from a wide spectrum of religious perspectives. (emphasis mine)

Turner, James. “Secularization and Sacralization: Speculations on Some Religious Origins of the Secular Humanities Curriculum, 1850-1900.” The Secularization of the Academy. George M. Marsden and Bradley J. Longfield, eds. New York: Oxford UP, 1992. 74-106. 1-16-09 Hard copy in file (or soon will be). BACKGROUND

Vander Lei, Elizabeth, and Lauren Fitzgerald. “What in God’s Name? Administering the Conflicts of Religious Belief in Writing Programs” WPA 31.1/2 (Fall/Winter 2007): 185-195. Sara gave me a copy March 2008.  Hard copy in file. 1-23-09 Got pdf now too. CATEGORY 2. BACKGROUND.

Vander Lei, Elizabeth. “Coming to Terms with Religious Faith in the Composition Classroom: Introductory Comments.” Negotiating Religious Faith in the Composition Classroom. Eds. Elizabeth Vander Lei and bonnie Lenore kyburz.  Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook, 2005. 3-10. Own book.

Vander Lei, Elizabeth. “Religious Faith in Composition Courses.” Teaching Composition. March 2006. 10 Jan 2009. http://www.mhhe.com/socscience/english/tc/vanderlei/vanderlei_module.html. Word, and hard copy in file.

Vander Lei, Elizabeth, and Donald R. Hettinga. “A Comment on ‘A Radical Conversion of the Mind’: Fundamentalism, Hermeneutics, and Metanoic Classroom.'” College English 64 (2002): 720-723. Hard copy in file.

Vander Lei, Elizabeth (contact person). The Symposium on Rhetoric and Christian Tradition. Hosted by Calvin College. Bibliography. http://www.calvin.edu/rhetoricandchristiantradition/ [added 12-3-09]
“The Symposium on Rhetoric and Christian Tradition seeks to foster scholarship that explores not only how rhetoric shapes the reading and writing associated with Christian tradition but also how particular aspects of Christian tradition have shaped rhetorical theory and supposedly secular rhetorical situations.”

“Members of the Symposium on Rhetoric and Christian Tradition explore the many ways that Christian tradition and rhetorical theory intersect. In so doing, we complicate English studies’ “implacable secularism” (Anne Gere’s term for the habit of segregating religious ideas from scholarly work, of falsely distinguishing thinking from feeling and knowing from believing). We believe that rhetorical history, topics, and situations may be shaped by aspects of Christian tradition such as theology, hermeneutics, social relationships, cultural practices, and identities. We believe that the rich diversity of experiences and beliefs associated with Christian tradition offer scholars in rhetoric and composition new vistas for considering a wide range of topics in our field.”

Wagner, Joseph B. “Faith in the composition class: A Pragmatic approach to common ground.” 2007 Diss. The University of North Carolina at Greensboro. DAI, 68, no. 04A (2007): p. 1446. pdf, and hard copy in binder.

ABSTRACT: In recent years, composition classes in universities across the country have focused more and more on social and political issues like race, class, and gender. At its base, this dissertation argues that prophetic religious belief should receive such a focus as well. This project also attempts to recognize the difficulties that might arise when addressing religion in the writing class and subsequently draws upon the thinking of the American Pragmatists to meet those difficulties. From this Pragmatic foundation, I explore notions of mediation, experience, habit, and certainty in the hopes of providing some orientation to a topic that is as important to our students as any other we ask them to consider.

My theoretical grounding is set out with an eye towards practical application in the classroom (as theory is little without practice, and practice little without theory). I address possible writing assignments, particular texts, and the use of current events in relation to the Pragmatic approach I describe. In sum, this dissertation is an attempt to help all of us—atheists and theists, students and teachers—broach the topic of religion in the composition class.

Webb, Stephen. Taking Religion to School: Christian Theology and Secular Education. Ada, MI: Fleming H. Revell Co. 2000. BACKGROUND

Williams, Bronwyn T. “The Book and the Truth: Faith, Rhetoric, and Cross-Cultural Communication.”  Negotiating Religious Faith in the Composition Classroom. Eds. Elizabeth Vander Lei and bonnie Lenore kyburz.  Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook, 2005. 105-120. Own book.

“Williams looks specifically at the potential and real discursive conflicts between Islam and Western religions and values, offering rare insight into a kind of religious discourse with which many writing instructors must come to terms in our changing culture.”

Williams, Bronwyn T. “Taken on Faith: Religion and Identity in Writing Classes.” Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy 48.6 (March 2005): 514–518. Pdf, and hard copy in file. ABSTRACT: In exploring her uneasiness in dealing with issues of religion in her classroom, the author asks, “Should I guide students away from writing about issues that explicitly dealt with their faith? Should I impose an outright prohibition on such writing? Or should I find ways to engage with the issues and the perspectives that were so clearly important to these students?” This insightful and reflective essay highlights the connections between faith and identity and the role that literacy may play in expression of both.

Worth, Jan. “Student Pieties and Pedagogical Hot Spots: Mediating Faith-Based Topics in First-Year Composition.” Writing on the Edge (WOE). 14.1 (2003): 21-30. pdf, hard copy in file. [Virtually same as CCCC presentation from 2002 with slightly different title.]

Wuthnow, Robert. “Living the Question — Evangelical Christianity and Critical Thought.” Cross Currents 40 (1990): 160-175. Word, and hard copy in file.  CATEGORY 1?

Wuthnow, Robert. “Pursuing the Sacred in the Academy’s “hallowed halls.”  The Witness. Sept 2000. (see URL on copy itself). Word, and hard copy. BACKGROUND.

Yagelski, Robert P. “Religion and Conformity in the Writing Classroom.” Radical Teacher 35 (Summer 1988): 26-29. [Yagelski did his PhD in Rhet/Comp under Andrea Lunsford] ILL’d 1-17-09. Have hard copy, but not filed yet. CATEGORY 1

Zuidema, Leah. “Christian Rhetoric Theory & Composition Pedagogy: A Bibliography of Contemporary Readings.” (at Michigan State University)Last updated: March 30, 2002″ https://www.msu.edu/~zuidema2/Christrhet”comp.html. [added 12-3-09]
“This page has been designed for scholars interested in developing and articulating faith-based rhetoric theories and composition pedagogies (especially within the Reformed tradition of historic Christianity). Some of the texts flow from Reformed Christianity, while others stem from other Christian or non-Christian traditions. I have selected 1980 as the arbitrary beginning point for the contemporary period; the bibliography is an incomplete representation of an emerging interest in faith-based rhetoric theories and composition pedagogies. I welcome recommendations for additions to the existing list.”

Zulick, Margaret D. “Rhetoric of Religion: A Map of the Territory.” The SAGE Handbook of Rhetorical Studies. Ed. Andrea A. Lunsford. Associate Eds Kirt H. Wilson and Rosa A. Eberly. Los Angeles: SAGE, 2009: 125- 138. Hard copy. See notes in “Introduction notes” file.

SOURCES WON’T USE:

Amorose, Thomas. “A Christian Rhetoric for the Public Sphere.” The Journal for Peace and Justice Studies XX (1999): 21-49. Submitted ILL request 12-16-08. Rec’d pdf 12-24-08. Hard copy in file.

Berthoff, Ann. Foreword. Literacy: Reading the Word and the World. By Paulo Freire and Donaldo Macedo. South Hadley, MA: Bergin and Garvey, 1987. Perkins 588: “Heeding Ann Berthoff’s commentary on Freire, I had already accepted the idea that their religious thinking equaled “pre-critical thought” that “must be not simply rejected but transformed” (xvi).”  AVAILABLE VALLEY LC149 .F75 1987

Bizzell, Patricia, ed. Rhetorical Agendas: Political, Ethical, Spiritual.  Mahwah: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2006. 375 pp. Ordered via Summit 1-22-09 “The papers in each section are not mutually exclusive to that section; for example, there is no separate section for spiritual because Bizzell felt that every section treats religious discourses in one way or another.”  from http://www.compositionstudies.tcu.edu/bookreviews/online/35-1/Adams%20Web.html

Bizzell, Patricia, ed. Negotiating Difference: Cultural Case Studies for Composition… [check title] 1996. ILL’d 2-27-09.

Farber, Paul. “Tongue Tied: On Taking Religion Seriously in School.” Educational Theory Vol. 45 Issue 1 Page 85 March 1995 . Hard copy in file.

Hardmeier, Christof. “Bible Reading AND Critical Thinking.” Critical Thinking and the Bible in the Age of New Media. Ed. Charles M. Ess. U P of America, 2004. 77-94. Hard copy in file.

Hebb, Judith. “Critical Thought and Christian Tradition.” Conference on College Composition and Communication, Chicago, IL. March 23, 2006. Ill’d 1-17-09.

Hebb, Judith. “Critical Thinking and Biblical Discernment.” Conference on College Composition and Communication, San Francisco, CA. March 17, 2005. Ill’d 1-17-09. 1-20-09 Informed it was not published so need to contact the author. jhebb@acc.edu Judith Hebb

Johnson, Peggy. “Growing Up Catholic: Religion in the Writing Center Contact Zone,” Midwest Writing Centers Association Conference, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, 2005 http://www.smumn.edu/sitepages/pid2903.php.

Jost, Walter, and Wendy Olmstead, eds. Rhetorical Invention and Religious Inquiry. Yale University Press, 2000. Ordered a used copy via Amazon 06-04-2008 to be sent to Yakima.

Mullins, Phil. “Bible Study, Critical Thinking, and Post-Critical Thought: Cultural Considerations.” Critical Thinking and the Bible in the Age of New Media. Ed. Charles M. Ess. U P of America, 2004. 269-290. Hard copy in file.

Rider, Sarah. “Tolerating Intolerance: Resisting the Urge to Silence Student Opinion in the Writing Classroom.” The Quarterly 25. 1 (Winter 2003): 31-36. Word, and hard copy in file.  Summary: Encountering one student’s white supremacist views, a teacher realizes that the expression of diverse opinions in class mustn’t be restricted to those that please the instructor. A Society of National Association Publications Gold Award winner. http://www.nwp.org/cs/public/print/resource/531  NOT ABOUT RELIGION ENOUGH? OR AT ALL??

7 thoughts on “Religion in the Writing Classroom bibliography

  1. Hi,

    Thanks for making this public! I’m working on a PhD reading list on the “spiritual but not religious” phenomenon and its connections with rhetoric and composition, and your list was helpful.

    Scott

  2. Hello

    is there a similar American literature on the contribution of faith to writing outside the composition classroom, i.e. in subject-specific or substantive classes? I am thinking particularly of constructivist-led disciplines in the social sciences and humanities. There is no such literature here in the UK that I can find.

    Thanks for such a useful resource.

    Best regards

    Paul
    University of Manchester, UK

    • Hi, Paul.

      I know there is literature on religion in higher education in general, but I don’t remember coming across anything on faith as it applies to content-based classes — well, with the exception of faith as it relates to teaching bible or philosophy or theology, that kind of thing. I did find a few of those (and I believe they’re in my bibliography).

      That’s such an interesting area, come to think of it — the role of faith in content-based classes (especially social science and humanities). So I wish you all good luck in finding some literature on it (and/or in generating some research on it yourself)!

      Laura

  3. Hi Paul, I follow this blog and saw your comment. There’s one article I’ve come across that I don’t see on Laura’s list:

    Edwards, Lynell. “Writing, Religion, and the Complex Spiritual Site of Evolution.” Language and Learning Across the Disciplines 5.2 (2001): n. pag.

    This piece looks at writing in a biology class on evolution at a private Christian college and examines how the instructor attempted to establish a class ethos that allowed students to simultaneously negotiate the demands of their fundamentalist Christian faith and the norms of science. If you want to see it and don’t have access through your university, I could email you a copy if you can sneak a spam-proof version of your address into a comment here.

    Thanks again for the resource, Laura!

    Scott

  4. Scott

    how very kind of you. I have managed to download a pristine copy from the Colostate WAC pages, so no problems there. This paper is extremely relevant and your email very timely, seeing as I am just trying to convince my department to put forward my research proposal on the lines I mentioned in my last post.

    Please by all means let me know if anything else crosses your path in similar vein. On my part, I am just starting to think about publishing the chapter from my PhD that addresses this matter, so if you would be interested in that once it reaches the light of day, do let me know.

    Thanks again and best regards

    Paul.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s